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The Jazz Pre-Season Begins!

The funny thing is that, being very nerdy, I naturally don't find a lot of point in a number of sports. I value athleticism, but not the warrior-like, adrenaline-induced behavior that certain sports seems to cultivate (i.e. football, hockey). On the other hand, I value skill and precision, but not watching it at a slow pace (i.e. baseball). Mostly, though, I think that I don't like being categorized with the stereotypical dad who does nothing but swig beer (or soda, in my case) all day, plopped on the couch watching his teams play.

A lot of this gets thrown out the window with basketball, though. While my wife has balanced me out quite a bit, since she usually goes to the Jazz games with me, I still classify myself as a fairly noisy fan in the crowds. I carefully follow the stats, analyze, and discuss ad nauseum with co-workers. I have trouble getting up to help my son with something (or leaving the house if it is on fire) if I'm watching a Jazz game. I exhibit signs of depression when they lose and the opposite when they win.

It's only with the Jazz, too. I can be perfectly calm and only exhibit the faintest resistance to stepping away from the game for a moment to help Kristi with stuff, etc.. Even the playoffs, if it is not the Jazz playing, do not induce that magnetic fanaticism that exists, latent inside me. don't follow high school or collegiate basketball more than the occasional headline, and, as soon as the Jazz season is over, I barely watch any of the playoffs, even the Finals.

Of course, I love playing basketball. However, it is easy to point out that I barely get an inkling of competitiveness in any other sport on the face of the Earth. (Except maybe chess, if that's a sport...) (Well, there's bowling, too, but this is more competitiveness with myself than anything.) When it comes to playing basketball, though, I am a completely different person.

I notice in myself a sincere hope that Remi and Zac come to love and appreciate playing basketball and watching the Jazz like I do. I hope that they play basketball in high school and practice for hours outsides because they love it so much. Of course, I'll be happy with whatever they find as their interests; however, I recognize that I will be just as happy if they like baseball as if they like basket weaving. What I would really like is for them to love basketball.

Anyway, sorry for the rambling post, but I simply find it interesting that it's "basketball" and not "sports". And "Jazz basketball" no less.

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