Skip to main content

I Declare!


A while back, we went to see an original transcription of the Declaration of Independence that was on display at the Utah State Capitol. The line was long, but it was one of the most worthwhile experiences that I have ever had.

Those who have been to the capitol will have an idea of how big the main floor is, but I'll try to do it justice. The declaration was in the center of an open, circular foyer, which connects the two wings of the main floor. The wings lead to the Office of the Governor, the Gold Room, and several other rooms, giving the patient spectators something to gaze at and talk about while they waited for their turn.

The line was long. It began at the northwest corner of the main floor and wrapped all the way around to the center foyer where the declaration patiently waited.

It took about 2 hours to get to the front of the line, and I to this day do not understand how my beautiful wife kept our two twin babies entertained, fed, clean, and happy nearly the entire time.

Once we got into the circular foyer, Remi's eyes rolled upwards to the 100-foot-high hemispherical ceiling with beautiful hand-painted murals of the Mormon Pioneers, California Gulls, and more.

Once the people just ahead of us got their turn, I began to tense up. How can I make this moment special for my boys? How could I possibly begin to impress upon them the value of this document and what it represented? What if they touch the glass with their oily hands?

Then, our turn arrived. We handed our camera to someone and took pictures.

I picked up each boy and showed them the Declaration of Independence. I started to read it to Remi:

"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator..."

I couldn't continue. I choked up, and just held him there for a moment while I said something stupid like "Isn't that wonderful, Remi?"

I wanted to stay there for a long time and picture each signer putting the quill to the paper. I wanted to feel the emotion that might have flowed through their breasts that testified of the enormity of what they were starting. I wanted Remi to feel that, too.

After remembering that everyone behind me had also been waiting for 2 hours, I put Remi down, picked Zac up, made a less emotionally-charged endeavor with him, and we gave our leave.

My heart was on fire for the next several hours with gratitude for these fine men and their courage to do what was right. It is a debt that I don't believe I will ever be able to repay.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

How Many Teeth Does The Tooth Fairy Pick Up Each Night in Utah?

Somebody asked me a question about my Tooth Fairy post the other day that got me thinking. How many baby teeth are lost every day in Utah? I began with Googling. Surely someone else has thought of this and run some numbers, right? Lo, there is a tooth fairy site that claims that the Tooth Fairy collects 300,000 teeth per night . That's a lot; however, when I ran the numbers, it started to seem awfully low. Let's assume that the Tooth Fairy collects all baby teeth regardless of quality and we assume that all children lose all their baby teeth. The world population of children sits at 2.2 billion , with 74.2 million of them in the United States. Of those, approximately 896,961 of them are in Utah . This means that somewhere around .04077% of the world's children are in Utah. If we assume that kids in Utah lose teeth at the same rate as all other children in the world and that each day in the year is just as likely as the rest to lose a tooth, then we have that of

BYU and the Sunday Compromise?

I read an article by Brad Rock this morning where he quoted heavily from Dr. Thomas Forsthoefel who was giving his opinion on religious institutions being involved in sports . BYU , of course, came up. I think Forsthoefel came off sounding a bit misinformed about the culture, drive, mission, etc. of BYU . Below is the email that I sent to Brad Rock this morning after finishing the article: Brad - That was an interesting article. I tend to disagree with Forsthoefel, though, or at least disagree with what I may have read into his comments. A quote in your article says: "There may be a kind of growing pain. BYU is in the real world and the real world works on Sunday. Can we (BYU) live with the adjustment? I'm empathetic with that, whatever decision is made, people are going to be unhappy.… Some will say get with the program, we'll be OK at the next level, others will say we've sold out and we've made a deal with the world." This seems to suggest one o

Baby Names: What my daughter's name has to do with an ancient Persian Fairy Tales

If you read my previous post on my sons' names, you'll know that this post is about my daughters' names. When we found out that we were going to have twins, I vowed that there names were not going to rhyme or alliterate. We weren't going to do Jadyn and Jordan, or Kim and Tim, or Esther and Edgar (all likely candidates for other, less elitist parents, especially Esther and Edgar). I did want the names to have something to do with one another somehow. Felicity Mae Cummings Felicity's first name has little to do with its underlying Hebrew meaning or its tie to Biblical history and everything to do with the fact that this was a name that Kristi had always wanted one of her girls to have because she liked that it meant "happiness". So, to tell you the truth, I didn't do a lot of research on this name because its place in our family had already been decided. But, it was excellent material to work with. The initial spark that 'Felicity' pro